Wednesday, 28 August 2013

How to Repair a Broken Golf Shaft a Simple Solution


Learn how to repair a broken golf shaft


After a simple knock a golf club shaft can easily snap into 2 pieces. Simply hitting a tree on the follow through golf swing is enough to render most golf clubs obsolete sending the shaft splintering into several pieces. This applies for both Steel Shaft and Carbon Graphite shafts so don’t think your club can survive depending upon its construction material.

I managed to break my trusted Jack Nicklaus Polarity Hi-CT 7 Iron this weekend just gone, by simply punching my golf ball out from the side of a small 3 meter tree. Being aware of the problems a tree and golf club combination can produce I had in my mind to gently punch the ball out form an almost impossible lie, the punch shot resulting in the ball traveling 5 to 6 meters back onto the fairway giving myself a though but doable 3rd shot onto the green.

My back swing was very gentle and simple with no great momentum, I only had to dink the ball a few meters after all! Then SNAP lifting the club up after the shot I felt strange physics upon my shaft and handle. The club had snapped right in the middle, with the 2 pieces dangling on a single thread of steel – to my amazement I showed my golfing partners and they were as surprised as I was.

The solution to fixing my golf club shaft is to take it to my local pro shop in Rivenhall Oaks Golf Club and get it re-shafted and re-gripped. I’ll keep you posted upon the outcome.

Buying a new grip is the first part of repairing a broken golf shaft

1 comment:

  1. Ok, I just wanted to clear something up from my previous email.

    It seems my suggestion about how Mr Miyagi and the Karate Kid could help you create your perfect, powerful and repeatable golf swing confused some people…and even caused some concern that I’d lost my marbles!

    I know the connection sounds a bit crazy, but let me explain…

    In my last email I said: “If you remember why Mr Miyagi was teaching the Karate Kid to “Wax On, Wax Off”, then Michael’s 6 Step Golf Lesson will make perfect sense to you.”

    No?…Still not making any sense?

    Well, it’s all about the true secret to a powerful, repeatable golf swing….muscle memory. Here’s what I mean:

    (If you’ve never seen the 1980’s Karate Kid movie and plan to watch it soon, this is a spoiler alert!)

    In the film, the young student, Daniel, asked the old Master, Mr Miyagi, to teach him karate. When Mr Miyagi reluctantly agreed, Daniel expected to be trained how to kick butt right then and there. Instead Mr Miyagi confused his eager student by making him polish his old car. But more importantly he insisted Daniel use very specific arm movements. So, using big outward circular movements Daniel had to “wax on” with one hand and “wax off” with the other.

    Absolutely nothing to do with karate…or so we thought! We were so wrong!

    It turns out that later in the movie young Daniel uses these exact “wax on, wax off” movements to powerfully deflect incoming punches and kicks from his nasty opponent.

    Daniel unknowingly learned these vital defence moves easily, embedding them deep in his muscle memory, so they became second-nature and completely automated.

    That’s what Michael Bannon’s 6 Step Golf Lesson does for your golf swing.

    See it here now. ===> No.1 Golf Coach Reveals Simple Technique <=====

    It embeds your perfect swing deep in your muscle memory, automating it and creating more power and accuracy.

    The training is unique but it’s not difficult, in fact you might be tempted to think it’s TOO EASY…but don’t let yourself be fooled. Just like the karate kid, have faith in the Master’s teaching.

    Check it out for yourself right here. ===> Karate helps golf?…Really?? <=====

    Just as Daniel put his trust in Mr Miyagi, you can put your trust in Michael Bannon. After all, if Rory McIlroy believes in him, I guess you can too.

    See you inside.

    P.S. Remember to K.I.S.S. Check it out here. ===> No.1 Golf Coach Reveals Simple Technique <=====

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